VIDEO: Workplace Violence Prevention


Workplace violence is an issue that safety professionals need to acknowledge and address. Although some organizations such as health care facilities and late-night retail establishments face increased risks for violence, the potential for a violent incident exists across organizations of all sizes, in all industries and in all geographic locations.

The outcome can be deadly. In 2014, workplace homicides claimed the lives of 403 people in the United States, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. Although that figure is considerably lower than the 677 workplace homicides that occurred in 2000, it still represents 8.6 percent of 4,679 on-the-job fatalities in 2014. Meanwhile, OSHA has stated that almost 2 million people report workplace violence every year, and many more cases likely go unreported.

In response, federal and state agencies have stepped up their efforts to help organizations implement and maintain effective workplace violence prevention programs. Grant funding is available for some workplace violence prevention training programs. Although federal OSHA and state agencies don’t have specific regulatory requirements on workplace violence, the General Duty Clause allows agencies to cite organizations that neglect the issue.

Although federal OSHA and state agencies don’t have specific regulatory requirements on workplace violence, the General Duty Clause allows agencies to cite organizations that neglect the issue.

The subject of violence in the workplace is extensively covered in this month’s edition of the NSC’s Safety & Health Magazine.